IRS Confirms ACA Mandate Penalties Still Effective

Matt Pfeiffenberger Health Benefits, News

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Office of Chief Counsel has recently issued several information letters regarding the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) individual and employer mandate penalties. These letters clarify that: Employer shared responsibility penalties continue to apply for applicable large employers (ALEs) that fail to offer acceptable health coverage to their full-time employees (and dependents); and Individual mandate penalties continue to apply for individuals that do not obtain acceptable health coverage (if they do not qualify for an exemption). These letters were issued in response to confusion over President Donald Trump’s executive order directing federal agencies to provide relief from the burdens of the ACA. Action Steps These information letters clarify that the ACA’s individual and employer mandate penalties still …

IRS Reaffirms ACA’s Employer Mandate

Matt Pfeiffenberger Health Benefits, News

By David J. Ledermann, Esq., Barley Snyder While the long-term future of the Affordable Care Act may be in doubt, the law’s application to employers remains largely unaffected by recent political developments. Information letters recently released by the IRS Office of Chief Counsel, responding to inquiries about the status of the ACA’s employer shared responsibility requirements (the “employer mandate”), emphasize that these requirements remain effective. Therefore, an “applicable large employer” (an organization, or group of related organizations, that averaged at least 50 or more full-time equivalent employees in the prior year) could face penalties for failing to offer adequate health coverage to full-time employees and their non-spouse dependents. The IRS information letters indicate that no waivers under the employer mandate …

What Happens if the ACA Employer Mandate is Repealed?

Mary Lyons Health Benefits

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) requires applicable large employers (ALEs) to offer affordable, minimum value health coverage to their full-time employees in order to avoid possible penalties. Because this employer mandate has been criticized as burdensome for employers and an impediment to business growth, its repeal has been a central part of Republican plans to repeal and replace the ACA. If the employer mandate is repealed, many ALEs will likely want to modify their plan designs to go back to pre-ACA eligibility rules (for example, requiring employees to have a 40-hour-per-week work schedule to be eligible for benefits). Employers may also consider increasing the amount that employees are required to contribute for group health plan coverage. Current Status of the …