Snow Removal Injury Prevention

Angela Mackley Risk Management

Common snow removal injuries and medical emergencies include overexertion of muscles, falling, lower-back injuries, broken bones, and heart-related problems. The arms and hands are the most common area for bone fractures, while adults over 55 were more than four times likely to have heart-related symptoms while shoveling, compared to younger people. Preventing falls includes those that occur while workers are removing snow from rooftops or other elevated surfaces. To keep workers safe, employers should develop plans for snow removal methods that do not involve workers being on rooftops. Safe working tips include: 1. Dressing appropriately – Wearing layers of clothing allows for both ventilation and insulation. Keep the head warm, as this is where a lot of body heat escapes. …

New OSHA Rule Effective January 1, 2017 Hits Big Companies First

Matt Olphin Business Insurance, Human Resources, Risk Management

New reporting regulations are effective January 1, 2017. What has to be published? According to OSHA as of “Jan. 1, 2017, [OSHA]requires certain employers to electronically submit injury and illness data that they are already required to record on their onsite OSHA Injury and Illness forms.” This is covered employers who have 250 or more employees. According to the guidance: OSHA will provide a secure website that offers three options for data submission. First, users will be able to manually enter data into a webform. Second, users will be able to upload a CSV file to process single or multiple establishments at the same time. Last, users of automated recordkeeping systems will have the ability to transmit data electronically via …