USDA Enhances African Swine Fever Surveillance Efforts

Courtney Meyer Agribusiness, News

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is furthering its overall African Swine Fever (ASF) preparedness efforts with the implementation of a surveillance plan. As part of this plan, the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) will work with the swine industry, the states, and veterinary diagnostic laboratories to test for ASF. ASF is a highly contagious and deadly disease affecting both domestic and feral (wild) pigs. It does not affect human health and cannot be transmitted from pigs to humans. ASF has never been detected in the United States. Tell me more >>>

Nearly 39 million intended corn acres have yet to be planted

Denise Gillin Agribusiness

Just 58% of the U.S. corn crop had been planted as of May 26, an advance of just nine percentage points over the past week and well shy of the 63% planted the market anticipated and 90% for the five-year average. This easily takes out 1995 as the slowest planting pace on record for this point in the season. Based on USDA’s planting intentions projection of 92.792 million acres, there are an astonishing 38.973 million intended corn acres yet to be planted with the calendar flipping to June on Saturday. Delays are most striking in the eastern Corn Belt, with Illinois 35% planted (95% on average), Indiana at 22% (85%) and Ohio at 22% (78%). But delays are also significant …

Avian Coryza

Courtney Meyer Agribusiness, News

Avian Coryza is an emerging poultry respiratory disease in some regions of the United States. Severe facial edema is probably the most notorious clinical sign which couples with a sharp decrease in egg production in laying hens. Read more here >>> For Pennsylvania Department of Ag flock recommendation letter: Flock recommendation letter 4-4-19 Final For Pennsylvania Department of Ag biosecurity principles: StandardE-BiosecurityPrinciples 2019

Farm Bureau Disaster Relief

Denise Gillin Agribusiness, News

No one is certain how much devastation the flooding and blizzard have caused in Nebraska, but total losses from livestock and crops could reach billions according to the “Omaha World-Herald”. Nebraska Farm Bureau established a Disaster Relief Fund at the Nebraska Farm Bureau Foundation to provide emergency aid to Nebraska farmers, ranchers, and rural communities affected by recent storms and flooding. Priority will be given to efforts to restore health and safety in rural communities and to farm and ranch households that have been damaged or displaced by the natural disaster. 100% of the donations will be distributed to Nebraska farmers, ranchers, and rural communities affected by the disasters. For information on how you can help >>>>

Does Your Business Need a Spotted Lanternfly Permit?

Matt Olphin Agribusiness, News, Risk Management

To prevent the spread of spotted lanternfly, the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture (PDA) issued a quarantine for counties where the presence of this pest has been confirmed. Businesses and organizations conducting business in the quarantine zone must have permits from PDA to move vehicles, equipment and goods within and out of the zone. Click for more information >>>

7 Tips for Grain Bin Safety

Courtney Meyer Agribusiness, News

Today’s large grain augers can transfer from two to four times as much grain as augers of the past. Your body can become completely submerged in about 8 seconds, leaving you helpless. Crusted, spoiled and wet grain associated with wet harvest (as well as remaining grain from last year’s wetter harvest) can also contribute to grain bin suffocation. As grain is removed from the bin it can bridge and form a cavity under the crusted surface. There’s little chance of survival if you are walking on the surface when the crust breaks and you plunge into flowing or hot grain. Read the safety tips here >>>

Farm Bureau Urges FDA to Enforce Milk Labeling Standards

Courtney Meyer Agribusiness, News

Pennsylvania Farm Bureau is urging the Food and Drug Administration to vigorously enforce food standards regarding the labeling of dairy products and prohibit the misleading labeling of nut-based and plant-based food products as “milk.” “Products identified as almond milk, soy milk and similar items are not being held to the same FDA standards as milk and dairy products that come from healthy cows, yet they still benefit by using the term ‘milk’ on their packaging,” said PFB President Rick Ebert. “Through their packaging, labeling and location in the refrigerated dairy section, these imitation products directly compete with and are marketed as substitutes for beverage milk products. It’s time for FDA to enforce its existing rule and forbid imitation nut and …

Mad Cow Disease: BSE Case Found on Farm in Scotland

Courtney Meyer Agribusiness, News

A case of BSE, commonly known as mad cow disease, has been detected on a farm in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, officials have revealed. A statement issued by Scottish authorities said “precautionary movement restrictions” had been put in place at the farm. Experts stressed it was a case of classical BSE, so posed no harm to human health. Investigations are underway to determine the origin of the disease, which has not been seen in Scotland in 10 years.   Read more here >>>

Silo Filling Safety

Courtney Meyer Agribusiness, News

Prepared by Dennis J. Murphy, Distinguished Professor, Pennsylvania State University   Few farming operations provide as many different opportunities for accidents to happen as filling the silo. High powered equipment, working in close quarters, and the potential of silo gas formation combine to produce numerous injury incidents throughout the late summer and fall. Read safety information here >>>

Department of Agriculture Urges Farmers to Protect Against Flood Damage

Courtney Meyer Agribusiness, News

From the July 2018 Farm Link newsletter… Agriculture Secretary Russell Redding today urged farmers and pet owners, particularly in central Pennsylvania, to prepare for the potential of flooding due to recent heavy rains. “It is critical that Pennsylvanians protect their animals, property, and assets against flooding, and many steps can be taken now to prevent future damage,” Redding said. Redding offered the following tips to help agricultural producers minimize damage caused by floodwaters: Ensure manure storage area has sufficient capacity, as rains can add to depth. Relocate livestock and animals from low-lying, flood-prone areas. Move machinery, feed, grain, pesticides, herbicides, forage bales and nursery stock to higher elevation. Store enough livestock feed and water for 72 hours. Fill generators with …